Thoughts on the Megachurch

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By Shawn Boonstra

For the introvert, introspection is a huge part of worship and spiritual growth—we can't survive without it. We find a lot of social interaction draining, and disruptive to the world of thought.  

According to some studies, roughly one-third of the public is wired this way, and western culture, since the early 20th century, has been decidedly extroverted. It's an uncomfortable culture for your introverted friends. Understand: when an introvert suddenly disappears from a social gathering, it's not because they don't like you, it's because they need to.  

The Taste of Summer

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By Jean Boonstra

Rocks Are Hard!

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By Alex Rodriguez

There were better locations on our property as far as soil goes, but this one was so convenient that I was determined to make it work. A quick survey of the landscape revealed that it was a bit rocky. Initially, I planned to fire up my tiller, but then came up with what I thought was a better plan. If I turned the soil with a plow, then I could see the rocks better, toss them out of the way, then run the tiller. Sounds like a brilliant idea, right? Well, obviously, I've never had to work with rocky soil. 

Bait and Switch Religion

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By Shawn Boonstra

Time for a confession: I'm a bit of a domain squatter. In the rare down moment, I like to cruise domain registries looking for unused web addresses. When I find a good one, I snap it up and sit on it. One day, I'll either use it or sell it.

Fitful

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By Jean Boonstra

My purple-banded Fitbit is now my constant companion. It tracks my steps and my active minutes, and would even track my calories and water intake levels if I bothered to input them. I love the fact that my new friend buzzes my wrist when it is time to get up from my desk and walk around, and cheers for me when I reach my step goals. The silent alarm is probably a marriage-saver for this morning person married to a night owl.

My Only Regret!!!

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By Alex Rodriguez

But I don’t want to dwell on her death in this blog. Instead, I wish to share briefly about my visit with her a few weeks back. As I mentioned in the previous blog, I dreaded going to see her in this condition. After all, what does one say to a dying friend? Nevertheless, I flew there to see her and was determined to do so no matter what condition she was in. 

Raising Chicago

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By Shawn Boonstra

During the early part of the 19th century, typhoid and dysentery were regular problems. In 1854, a cholera outbreak took out a whopping six percent of the population.  

Resume of Failures

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By Jean Boonstra

Our modern world has magnified a timeless problem—our individual failures make us feel isolated and alone. I hear a lot of talk about the need for transparency, but I know very few people who willingly admit their failures to friends and colleagues. I don’t know any who would willingly broadcast them to the world. Our social media profiles are great examples of this.

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